A Lesson in Pirate

I hear ye; the allure of the sea has taken hold o’ ye, and tales of treasure and adventures upon the tide have ye wanting to learn more about the swashbucklers portrayed in the movies. Have ye found the ultimate source o’ pirate knowledge, all amassed in one place? Er, no. We have some links at the bottom ye may wish to try for that, but what we DO have for ye is the simplest and most effective lesson about pirates.

Let’s begin. First things first, get to know the islands a pirate haunted in the Golden Age of Piracy: The Caribbean Sea

(The blue stuff be water)

(The blue stuff be water)

Which islands did the pirates haunt? Basically, all of them, but Jamaica, Nassau, and Tortuga were some of the best known pirate havens, where lawlessness abounded. Next, get to know the ship. Ships changed over time, and captains could make changes as they pleased so that no ship was exactly the same as the others, but here’s a galleon; the kind of sailing ship which springs to mind.

(Real ships, a'course, weren't open on the side)

(Real ships, a’course, weren’t open on the side)

Want a simpler one? Try this:

(It's right there, in black and white!)

(It’s right there, in black and white!)

A pirate would want a smaller ship, like a frigate or a schooner, which would be easier to hide and quicker in a hasty retreat. When retreat doesn’t work so well, however, it’s time for cannons!

(Real cannons didn't come with labels, by the by)

(Real cannons didn’t come with labels, by the by)

A cannon took more than one man to fire, and when they did the sound was great and the damage incredible. When cannons fail, it’s time for blades and firearms. The blade of the pirate was the cutlass, or the saber:

(Royal Marines were fond of straight swords, but these didn't work well on the rolling tide!)

(Royal Marines were fond of straight swords, but these didn’t work well on the rolling tide!)

There were three major types of firearms, which are here labeled in order of weakest to strongest:

(Blackbeard was a fan of the blunderbuss, which means thunder pipe)

(Blackbeard was a fan of the blunderbuss, which means thunder pipe)

With that, well done! You now know all ye really need to know about what a pirate was all about. If ye’re still yearning more more, ye may want to check out this glossary of pirate words or this list of ships. For more research, we recommend ye study the Golden Age of Piracy, and the Pirate Round.

Good luck, and may fortune sail with yer! Oh, and one last thing:

talk-like-a-pirate-chart

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2 comments on “A Lesson in Pirate

  1. Pingback: Become a Pirate, Fast! | Jollier Roger Cove

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